EPISODES
  • How the Bicycle Mayor of Toronto is Making Toronto's Streets Safer for All | Lanrick Bennett Jr., Joycelyn Guan & Erin

    Join me, along with my co-hosts Joycelyn and Erin, as we dive into an insightful conversation with Lanrick Bennett Jr., Toronto's Bicycle Mayor, and the Executive Director of Charlie's FreeWheels. We explore his tenure as a bike mayor and the expansive network of BYCS-appointed mayors, stretching from India to Uganda and beyond.

    In this episode, we discuss crucial topics such as Vision Zero and efforts to reduce vehicular-related fatalities in Toronto. We delve into designing inclusive cycling infrastructure and offer advice for those looking to cycle in the city and who want to get involved in making their streets safer for all.

    Key insights from the episode include:

    • Understanding the significance of inclusive cycling infrastructure
    • Exploring how Shaw St has evolved into Toronto's cycling haven
    • The importance of political will in creating safer streets
    • Ways to actively contribute to advocating for safer streets in your community
    • Insights from international transit advocates on Toronto's cycling infrastructure
    • What it takes to ensure safer streets for cyclists, pedestrians, and drivers alike
    • The global network of Bicycle Mayors and their impact on urban development
    • And much more


    Guest: Lanrick Bennett Jr., Bicycle Mayor of Toronto & Executive Director of Charlie’s FreeWheels

    Co-Hosts: Joycelyn Guan and Erin

    Acknowledgements:

    This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and the Department of Geography and Planning. 

    About Urban Limitrophe:


    Credits: 

    • Music by Imany Lambropoulos
    • Podcast concept, development, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos
    1h 9m | Dec 21, 2023
  • Artistry Beyond Borders: Exploring the Power of Public Art in Toronto with Destinie Adélakun

    This episode marks the first video episode of the podcast! Here's a sneak peek of my conversation with Destinie Adélakun, an emerging multi-disciplinary artist, who masterfully weaves her Nigerian-Indian heritage into her breathtaking solo exhibition, "Journey of Adé." Destinie also shares the excitement of exhibiting at Toronto's renowned Nuit Blanche, her work bridging mental wellness and public art as part of the Scarborough-based Behind the Art Collective, and the crucial role that public art plays in shaping the identity of our cities. 

    This is just a snippet of our conversation. To watch our full discussion head on over to the new Urban Limitrophe YouTube channel to see all of the art pieces that Destinie refers to in the episode.

    Guest: Destinie Adélakun, Behind the Art Collective

    Acknowledgements:

    This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities, the Department of Geography and Planning, and GlowReel

    About Urban Limitrophe:

    Please visit www.urbanlimitrophe.com for all episode show notes and references and guest details. 

    Subscribe to the newsletter: https://shorturl.at/dKQV9

    Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com 

    12m | Dec 18, 2023
  • How the Charter Cities Institute Promotes Inclusive and Adaptable Planning for Sustainable New Cities | Heba Elhanafy

    Join me in this captivating episode of the podcast as I have an insightful conversation with Heba Elhanafy, an urban researcher from the Charter Cities Institute (CCI) Zambia. Together, we explore the fascinating world of charter city development and dive deep into the Planning Guidelines Report titled "Guided Organic Growth: An urban planning framework for charter cities." 

    In this episode, you'll learn about:

    • What are charter cities and why promoting good governance is at the heart of making them work
    • The benefits of taking an incremental approach to infrastructure development for more affordability and efficiency 
    • The importance of adapting urban policies and plans to the evolving needs of citizens
    • And much more!


    Guest: Heba Elhanafy, Charter Cities Institute (CCI) Zambia


    Acknowledgements:

    This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and the Department of Geography and Planning. 


    About Urban Limitrophe:

    Please visit www.urbanlimitrophe.com for all episode show notes and references and guest details. 

    Instagram & Twitter: @urbanlimitrophe 

    Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com 

    Credits: 

    Music and editing by Imany Lambropoulos

    Podcast concept, development, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos

    43m | May 29, 2023
  • How Ushahidi is Using Crowdsourcing to Help Community Disaster Response and Recovery | Angela Oduor Lungati

    In this episode, I chat with Angela Oduor Lungati, the CEO of Ushahidi. Ushahdi is a mobile platform dubbed “Africa’s Gift to Silicon Valley” by the New York Times. Born out of a crisis, the open-source software enables virtually anyone with a cellphone or internet connection to efficiently crowd-source information, map it and share it with those the most in need and guide those who can provide aid. Ushahidi is a powerful planning and decision-making tool for communities and cities in the midst of an emergency and has been used by groups worldwide to track everything from COVID-19 recovery to police brutality and everything in between. 

    In this episode, you'll learn about:

    • how Ushahidi has been leveraged by communities and governments worldwide, 
    • how to keep communities at the center of innovation, 
    • and much more!


    Guest: Angela Oduor Lungati, CEO of Ushahidi


    Acknowledgements:

    This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and the Department of Geography and Planning. 

    About Urban Limitrophe:

    Please visit www.urbanlimitrophe.com for all episode show notes and references and guest details. 

    Instagram & Twitter: @urbanlimitrophe 

    Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com 

    Credits: 

    Music and editing by Imany Lambropoulos

    Podcast concept, development, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos

    35m | Mar 28, 2023
  • Comment le Centre d'Art Waza fait la promotion des artistes et de l'art populaire à Lubumbashi | Patrick Mudekereza

    En novembre 2021, j'ai eu le plaisir de parler avec M. Patrick Mudekereza le Directeur Exécutif du Centre d'Art Waza. Le Centre d'Art Waza, situé à Lubumbashi, en République démocratique du Congo une ville désignée en 2015 par l'UNESCO, comme étant la Ville créative d'artisanat et des arts populaires. Ainsi, pendant notre discussion nous parlons par rapport de la créativité des Lushois, du rôle de l'art public dans la ville, les projets divers dirigés par le Centre et ce qui fait de Lubumbashi une Ville Créative.

    Dans cet épisode, vous découvrirez:

    • pourquoi l’art public est si important pour les villes et les communautés qui les accueillent,
    • l'histoire de la ville de Lubumbashi d'un perspective artistique,
    • qu’est-ce qui fait de Lubumbashi une ville aussi créative,
    • et bien plus encore!

     

    Invité: Patrick Mudekereza


    Remerciements:

    Cet épisode est co-parrainé par l'Université de Toronto School of Cities et le Département de Geographie et de l'Aménagement 

    Urban Limitrophe:

    Veuillez visitez www.urbanlimitrophe.com pour toutes les notes et références de l’émission et les détails sur les invités.


    Assistance: 

    • Monteur et producteur de musique: Imany Lambropoulos
    • Animatrice de podcast et graphiste: Alexandra Lambropoulos
    51m | Oct 9, 2022
  • How CLUSTER is Bridging Western Urban Understanding From the Middle East to North Africa | Salma Elbasty & Sami Ferwati

    In this episode, my co-host Sami Ferwati and I chat with Salma Elbasty from CLUSTER (Cairo Lab for Urban Studies, Training and Environmental Research). CLUSTER undertakes a number of research, architecture, and arts-based urban initiatives with a special focus on analyzing urban informality and highlighting its role in our cities. During our discussion, we explore the impact of two of CLUSTER's major projects—the CAUL (Critical Arab Urban Lexicon) and their Creativity in Action toolkit—and how through their diverse programming they work with artists, artisans, academics, businesses, communities, and everyone else in between to bring their projects to life.


    In this episode, you'll learn about:

    • urban informality and its role in creative cities,
    • the process CLUSTER follows to undertake their various creative, community-based activities,
    • the Critical Arab Urban Lexicon (CAUL) and the importance of translating urban terms into different languages, 
    • ALFABRIKA, CLUSTER's maker space and community hub,
    • and much more!


    Guest: Salma Elbasty, CLUSTER

    • Website: www.clustercairo.org
    • Twitter: @clustercairo
    • Instagram: @clustercairo


    Co-Host: Sami Ferwati


    Acknowledgements:

    This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and the Department of Geography and Planning. 


    About Urban Limitrophe:

    • Please visit www.urbanlimitrophe.com for all episode show notes and references and guest details. 
    • Instagram & Twitter: @urbanlimitrophe 
    • Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com 


    Credits: 

    • Music by Imany Lambropoulos
    • Podcast concept, development, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos
    35m | Aug 22, 2022
  • How Book Bunk is Restoring Public Libraries Across Nairobi | Marion Anvango & Jane O'Brien Davis

    In this episode, my co-host Jane O'Brien Davis and I chat with Marion Anvango at Book Bunk. Book Bunk is "working to restore some of Nairobi's most iconic public libraries into sites of heritage, public art, collective memory, knowledge production, shared experiences, cultural leadership and information exchange." During our discussion, we explore their diverse series of programming that they offer in their public library branches. We also chat about Book Bunk's approach to restoring libraries to make them more inclusive and accessible and cultivate a sense of belonging for the local community. 

    In this episode, you'll learn about:

    • how they involve the community in the restoration of public libraries,
    • their experiential, digital, architectural, and social approach to restoring public libraries,
    • their efforts to make library services more accessible for those living with disabilities,
    • why public libraries are so important for cities to have,
    • and much more!


    Guest: Marion Anvango, Book Bunk


    Co-Host: Jane O’Brien Davis


    Acknowledgements:

    This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and the Department of Geography and Planning. 

    About Urban Limitrophe:

    Please visit www.urbanlimitrophe.com for all episode show notes and references and guest details. 

    Instagram & Twitter: @urbanlimitrophe 

    Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com 


    Credits: 

    Music by Imany Lambropoulos

    Podcast concept, development, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos

    40m | Aug 15, 2022
  • How Black Futures Now Toronto Turned Local Histories into a Virtual Community Centre | Adwoa Afful

    In this episode, I chat with Adwoa Afful, the founder of Black Futures Now Toronto (BFN TO). BFN TO is collective that uses a mixture of storytelling, radical mapping, and a whole lot of creative talent, to develop a number of interactive ways of archiving, experiencing, and celebrating overlooked Black histories and geographies. During our talk, we explore their innovative Mapping Black Futures (MBF) story mapping project, and how in collaboration with Black nonbinary youth and women from across the Greater Toronto Area, they built a virtual community centre that highlights Black histories and placemaking. 

    In this episode, you'll learn about:

    • why it's important to map Black histories and Black geographies,
    • what is counter/radical mapping and how it can be used as a tool for community building,
    • how Black Futures Now Toronto developed their virtual community centre,
    • the youth responsible for creating the content for the Mapping Black Futures project,
    • and much more!


    Guest: Adwoa Afful, Black Futures Now Toronto


    Acknowledgements:

    This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and the Department of Geography and Planning. 

    About Urban Limitrophe:

    Please visit www.urbanlimitrophe.com for all episode show notes and references and guest details. 

    Instagram & Twitter: @urbanlimitrophe 

    Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com 

    Credits: 

    Music by Imany Lambropoulos

    Editing by Hannah Ahamedi

    Podcast concept, development, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos

    44m | Jul 24, 2022
  • How Buildher is Empowering Women Through Construction | Tatu Gatere

    In this episode, I speak with Tatu Gatere, the co-founder and CEO of Buildher. Buildher is a non-profit based in Nairobi Kenya that is on a mission to promote gender equality within the construction industry through the provision of accredited construction, artisanry, and manufacturing skills to women that participate in their training program. Through their holistic approach to skills training and workforce development, Buildher is working hard to knock down biases and close the gender gap in the construction industry in Kenya and beyond.

    In this episode, you'll learn about:

    • Buildher's holistic approach to training women in the construction and artisanry,
    • why it's important for women to be involved in the construction/urban infrastructure sector, 
    • recommendations for integrating more women into the construction sector,
    • the exciting projects (i.e. their new product line) that Buildher has in store,
    • their upcoming podcast's and programming's focus on youth employability in Kenya,
    • and much more!


    Guest: Tatu Gatere, CEO and Co-Founder of Buildher

    • Website: https://www.buildher.org/


    Acknowledgements:

    This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and the Department of Geography and Planning. 


    About Urban Limitrophe:

    Please visit www.urbanlimitrophe.com for all episode show notes and references and guest details. 

    Instagram: @urbanlimitrophepodcast

    Twitter: @urbanlimitrophe

    Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com 

    Credits: 

    Music by Imany Lambropoulos

    Editing by Hannah Ahamedi

    Podcast concept, development, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos

    47m | Jun 30, 2022
  • How Justice Defenders is Using Education to Defend the Defenceless | Milly Kakungulu & Hannah Ahamedi

    In this episode, my co-host Hannah Ahamedi and I chatted with Milly Kakungulu, the Education Department Lead at Justice Defenders Uganda. Through our discussion, we learned more about how the Justice Defenders (formerly known as the African Prisons Project) are defending the defenceless by educating prisoners on how to provide legal services for themselves and others. 

    In this episode, you'll learn about:

    • the importance of a people-centred approach to justice,
    • the different challenges that prisoners face with getting access to justice in the current legal system,  
    • the Justice Defenders model (education, training, practice) and the various opportunities that Justice Defenders provides participants,
    • how prisoners have leveraged the education Justice Defenders' has provided them to transform their own lives and influence policies that improve justice within their communities at various government levels,
    • the Reach Alliance (@reachallianceto ) and how our research project inspired Hannah and I to create this episode,
    • and much more!


    Guest: Milly Kakungulu, Education Department Lead at Justice Defenders


    Co-Host: Hannah Ahamedi

    Acknowledgements:

    This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and the Department of Geography and Planning. 

    About Urban Limitrophe:

    Please visit www.urbanlimitrophe.com for all episode show notes and references and guest details. 

    Instagram & Twitter: @urbanlimitrophe 

    Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com 

    Credits: 

    Music by Imany Lambropoulos

    Editing by Hannah Ahamedi

    Podcast concept, development, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos.

    1h 10m | Apr 29, 2022
  • How Lima’s Sonic Landscapes Are Shaped by Afro-Peruvian Women | Roxana Escobar Ñañez

    In this episode, I chat again with Roxana Escobar Ñañez. Roxana is pursuing her Ph.D. in Human Geography at the University of Toronto and she was recently one of five special guests on the 12th episode of the podcast. Given her unique research interests, after our last conversation, I decided to invite her to the show again to dive deeper into her work examining 'the places Afro-Peruvian women hold in Lima’s sonic landscapes' and Black womanhood in Latin America and to get a better understanding about how these themes of music, Blackness, and cities emerge in the diaspora. What started off as a discussion of her research turned into a vivid exploration of Lima's history through the lens of Afro-Peruvian music, food, culture, and most importantly Black joy and resilience. 

    In this episode, you'll learn about:

    • the project of mestizaje and the origins of criollo music and culture in Peru,
    • what are sonic landscapes and how Afro-Peruvian women, in particular, are essential to shaping Lima's vibrant soundscape and unique cultural identity,
    • the key characteristics of Afro-Peruvian music, 
    • additional resources and artists to help you learn more about Afro-Peruvian culture and its impact in Peru,
    • the importance of highlighting Black joy when researching Black histories and geographies,
    • and much more!


    Guest: Roxana Escobar Ñañez


    Acknowledgements:

    This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and the Department of Geography and Planning. 

    About Urban Limitrophe:

    Please visit www.urbanlimitrophe.com for all episode show notes and references and guest details. 

    Instagram & Twitter: @urbanlimitrophe 

    Podcast concept, development, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos. 

    Music by Imany Lambropoulos

    Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com

    1h 10m | Apr 3, 2022
  • An Exploration of Black Excellence in Future Geographers and Planners at the University of Toronto | Jane, Brianna, Priscilla, Roxana & Bola

    This special episode of Urban Limitrophe is brought to you in collaboration with the Graduate Geography & Planning Student Society (GGAPSS) in celebration of Black History/Black Futures Month!

    In this episode, I speak with Roxana Escobar Ñañez (PhD Human Geography), Brianna Lane (MSc Physical Geography), Priscilla Ankomah-Hackman (MSc Planning), Jane O'Brien Davis (MSc Planning), and Bola Oshinusi (PhD Planning) to explore why they got interested in geography and planning, and their advice for other aspiring geographers and planners looking to study in this field.

    In this episode, you'll learn about each guests':

    • research interests and upcoming projects,
    • reasons for studying at the University of Toronto,
    • hopes for having more diversity in their respective field,
    • advice for other emerging geographers and planners,
    • and much more!


    Collaborator: Graduate Geography & Planning Student Society (GGAPSS) 

    • Twitter: @GGAPSS_UT
    • Instagram: @ggapss
    • Website: ggapss.wordpress.com/
    • LinkedIn: linkedin.com/company/ggapss/about/


    Guests (visit the podcast website for contact details):

    • Roxana Escobar Ñañez (PhD Human Geography)
    • Brianna Lane (MSc Physical Geography)
    • Priscilla Ankomah-Hackman (MSc Planning)
    • Jane O'Brien Davis (MSc Planning)
    • Bola Oshinusi (PhD Planning)


    Acknowledgements:

    This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and the Department of Geography and Planning. 

    About Urban Limitrophe:

    Please visit www.urbanlimitrophe.com for all episode show notes and references and guest details. 

    Instagram & Twitter: @urbanlimitrophe 

    Podcast concept, development, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos. 

    Music by Imany Lambropoulos

    Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com

    57m | Feb 27, 2022
  • How the Black Planning Project is Diversifying Urban Planning One Story at a Time | Abigail Moriah

    In this episode, I speak with Abigail Moriah, a registered urban planner and founder of the Black Planning Project. Through this initiative, Abigail and her team, collect and share the stories of Black urban planning professionals and students to highlight their important work and encourage more diverse voices to enter the profession. Most importantly, through its various mentorship opportunities and research endeavours, the Black Planning Project builds the relationships and community ties necessary to ensure that urban planning and hopefully the city-building sector makes room for new perspectives and ideas.

    In this episode, you'll learn:

    • why it is essential to encourage spaces where urban planners can discuss racial injustices in planning,
    • about some of the experiences and injustices that Black planners face in their profession,
    • about resources and advice for emerging urban planners of colour to help them navigate the field,
    • the importance of including diverse voices in the urban planning profession,
    • and much more!


    Guest: Abigail Moriah, The Black Planning Project / BPUA / MIIPOC

    Acknowledgements:

    This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and the Department of Geography and Planning. 

    The School of Cities "convenes urban-focused researchers, educators, students, practitioners and the general public to explore and address complex urban challenges, with the aim of making cities and urban regions more sustainable, prosperous, inclusive and just". To learn more about the School of Cities visit www.schoolofcities.utoronto.ca

    To learn more about the Department of Geography and Planning and the different undergraduate and graduate programs available please visit www.geography.utoronto.ca.

    About Urban Limitrophe:

    Please visit www.urbanlimitrophe.com for all episode show notes and references and guest details. 

    Instagram & Twitter: @urbanlimitrophe 

    Podcast concept, development, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos. 

    Editing by Hannah Ahamedi

    Music by Imany Lambropoulos

    Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com

    39m | Feb 20, 2022
  • How the BuildX Studio is Creating Dignified Circular Affordable Housing Across Kenya | Carolina Larrazábal

    In this episode, I speak with Carolina Larrazábal, the co-founder and design director at BuildX Studio. BuildX Studio is an innovative award-winning architectural studio based in Nairobi, which is the first architecture, engineering or construction company in Africa to become B Corp™ certified. The team at BuildX Studio is on a mission to build radically better buildings, and back in July 2021 I got to speak with Carolina to learn more about how her team is building dignified circular affordable housing in Kenya and how through their relationships and partnerships with other organizations such as their sister branch BuildHer, their work focuses on embedding equity, diversity and sustainability in every stage of the development process.

    In this episode, you'll learn about:

    • what is dignified affordable housing and what considerations go into creating it,
    • Mass timber/Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) and why BuildX thinks that it is the future of building materials in this region and beyond,
    • BuildX's Circular Cooperative Affordable Housing Project,
    • their efforts to build 10,000 affordable homes by 2030,
    • how they hope that their affordable homes will provide a pathway to homeownership for low-income sectors of the population,
    • and much more!


    Guest: Carolina Larrazábal


    Acknowledgements:

    This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and the Department of Geography and Planning. 

    The School of Cities "convenes urban-focused researchers, educators, students, practitioners and the general public to explore and address complex urban challenges, with the aim of making cities and urban regions more sustainable, prosperous, inclusive and just". To learn more about the School of Cities visit www.schoolofcities.utoronto.ca

    To learn more about the Department of Geography and Planning and the different undergraduate and graduate programs available please visit www.geography.utoronto.ca.


    About Urban Limitrophe:

    Please visit www.urbanlimitrophe.com for all episode show notes and references and guest details. 

    Instagram & Twitter: @urbanlimitrophe 

    Podcast concept, develepment, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos. 

    Music by Imany Lambropoulos

    Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com

    45m | Feb 13, 2022
  • How the Dikan Center Is Building the First Photo Library in Ghana | Paul Ninson

    In this episode, I speak with Paul Ninson, a photographer, and filmmaker about the importance of visual storytelling and how after collecting over 30,000 books on photography and film, he is in the beginning stages of building The Dikan Center. The center will be the first visual storytelling library in Ghana. The Dikan Center will train not only the next generation of storytellers but build a community hub that welcomes locals and newcomers alike to learn about, celebrate, and create African stories and flip the dominant, negative narrative about life on the continent.  

    In this episode, you'll learn about:

    • Paul's vision for the center and the programming it will provide,
    • the upcoming photography exhibition,
    • how he collected over 30,000 books to start the Dikan Center,
    • how the center will be an incubator for talent as well as community,
    • opportunities to get involved with getting the center built and learning/teaching about visual storytelling,
    • and much more!


    Guest: Paul Ninson


    Acknowledgements:

    This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and the Department of Geography and Planning. 

    The School of Cities "convenes urban-focused researchers, educators, students, practitioners and the general public to explore and address complex urban challenges, with the aim of making cities and urban regions more sustainable, prosperous, inclusive and just". To learn more about the School of Cities visit www.schoolofcities.utoronto.ca

    To learn more about the Department of Geography and Planning and the different undergraduate and graduate programs available please visit www.geography.utoronto.ca.

    About Urban Limitrophe:

    Please visit www.urbanlimitrophe.com for all episode show notes and references and guest details. 

    Instagram & Twitter: @urbanlimitrophe 

    Podcast concept, development, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos. 

    Music by Imany Lambropoulos

    Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com

    37m | Jan 17, 2022
  • How Waste Reclaimers Recycle 80 to 90% of South Africa's Waste | Dr. Melanie Samson

    In this episode, I speak with Dr. Melanie Samson, about the important role that waste reclaimers play in our cities, particularly in Johannesburg. Melanie works closely with the African Reclaimers Organization (ARO), a non-profit group that is fighting to get waste reclaimers the rights and recognition they deserve for their hard work and ensuring that their knowledge and perspectives are incorporated in the broader waste management system. 

    In this episode, you'll learn about:

    • why in some cities there can be no recycling without waste reclaimers,
    • the precarious conditions and inequality waste reclaimers face when doing their work,
    • the great strides that the African Reclaimers Organization (ARO) has made to get reclaimers the recognition they deserve,
    • why reclaimers are much more effective and efficient at collecting waste than private companies,
    • the steps people can take to support waste reclaimers work in their community,
    • and much more!


    Guest: Dr. Melanie Samson 


    This episode is co-sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and the Department of Geography and Planning. “The School of Cities convenes urban-focused researchers, educators, students, practitioners and the general public to explore and address complex urban challenges, with the aim of making cities and urban regions more sustainable, prosperous, inclusive and just.” To learn more about their work visit www.schoolofcities.utoronto.ca.

    More Urban Limitrophe:

    Episode show notes and references: www.urbanlimitrophe.com

    Instagram & Twitter: @urbanlimitrophe 

    Podcast concept, development, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos. 

    Music by Imany Lambropoulos

    Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com.

    36m | Dec 17, 2021
  • How OFF TO Magazine is Celebrating African Cities One Issue at a Time | Liz Gomis

    In this episode, I speak with Liz Gomis, about the inspiration and process of developing OFF TO Magazine. OFF TO Magazine is a bilingual, biannual magazine available online and through print, that explores African Cities through the eyes of local citizens. Each issue centers around one African city and uses the experience of local journalists, writers, artists, architects, urban planners, historians, and more, to dispel some myths about the city and share why it is a region worth heading off to.

    In this episode, you'll learn about:

    • how OFF TO Magazine lets the local citizens of each featured city guide the content of each issue,
    • common misconceptions about Africa and how they negatively shape the rest of the world's understanding of its various cities, regions and people,
    • why there needs to be a more holistic representation of African cities in popular media, 
    • how the magazine connects Africans across the diaspora, 
    • and much more!


    Guest: Liz Gomis


    This episode is sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities and co-supported by the Department of Geography and Planning. “The School of Cities convenes urban-focused researchers, educators, students, practitioners and the general public to explore and address complex urban challenges, with the aim of making cities and urban regions more sustainable, prosperous, inclusive and just.” To learn more about their work visit www.schoolofcities.utoronto.ca.

    This episode is also sponsored by Glowreel. Glowreel is a weekly newsletter, curated by women of colour and delivered straight to inboxes every Monday. Glowreel is here to highlight the stories and achievements of BIPOC women. The aim is to empower and inspire BIPOC women to celebrate their wins, discuss important issues impacting BIPOC women, and to encourage anyone who identifies as a BIPOC woman to blaze their own trail! To subscribe to the newsletter or submit a story please visit www.glowreel.co

    More Urban Limitrophe:

    Episode show notes and references: www.urbanlimitrophe.com

    Instagram/Twitter: @urbanlimitrophe 

    Podcast concept, development, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos. 

    Music by Imany Lambropoulos

    Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com.

    46m | Oct 6, 2021
  • How the Mmofra Foundation is Designing Playful and Child-Friendly Cities in Ghana | Amowi Phillips

    In this episode, I discuss urban play spaces and child-friendly cities with Amowi Phillips from the Mmofra Foundation. The Mmofra Foundations is a non-profit based out of Accra, Ghana that transforms urban spaces and urban green spaces into creative labs where children and youth can play and learn while being exposed to art, culture, and nature. 

    In this episode, you'll learn about:

    • how the organization uses creative placemaking and urban design to transform their Mmofra Place Park into an outdoor play and learning lab,
    • the highlights and challenges of implementing play spaces in Accra's marketplaces,
    • what a child-friendly/youth-friendly space looks, 
    • how the Mmofra Foundation is collaborating with other play experts across the continent to develop an Africa Play Network, 
    • and much more!


    Guest: Amowi Phillips 


    This episode is sponsored by the University of Toronto School of Cities. “The School of Cities convenes urban-focused researchers, educators, students, practitioners and the general public to explore and address complex urban challenges, with the aim of making cities and urban regions more sustainable, prosperous, inclusive and just.” To learn more about their work visit www.schoolofcities.utoronto.ca.

    More Urban Limitrophe:

    Episode show notes and references: www.urbanlimitrophe.com

    Instagram: @urbanlimitrophe 

    Podcast concept, development, and design by Alexandra Lambropoulos.

    Music by Imany Lambropoulos

    Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com.

    1h 18m | Aug 4, 2021
  • How Gbobètô is Turning Waste into Sustainable Energy in Port-Novo, Benin | Naomi Fagla Medegan

    In this episode, I discuss recycling and the importance of creating sustainable energy alternatives with Naomi Fagla Medegan, the founder of Gbobètô. Gbobètô is a non-profit based out of Porto-Novo, Benin that sees waste as a tool for social and sustainable development and through their various recycling programs works to make cities cleaner and communities empowered.

    In this episode, you'll learn about:

    • how biomass briquettes can be a source of sustainable and affordable energy in areas with poor electricity access
    • waste reclaimers and the work they do to keep cities clean
    • the trials, tribulations and triumphs of getting recycling infrastructure up and running in a city
    • and much more!


    Guest: Naomi Fagla Medegan


    Music by Imany Lambropoulos


    More Urban Limitrophe:

    • Episode show notes and references: www.urbanlimitrophe.com
    • Instagram: @urbanlimitrophe 
    • Podcast concept and development by Alexandra Lambropoulos. Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com.
    46m | Jun 13, 2021
  • How Hope Raisers Uses Digital Storytelling to Build Community Climate Resilience in Nairobi, Kenya | Daniel Onyango

    In this episode, I discuss a bit about community climate change adaptation and the importance of incorporating the youth voice in decision-making with Daniel Onyango, the founder of The Hope Raisers Initiative. The Hope Raisers Initiative uses arts, culture, and sports to amplify the youth voice in the neighbourhood of Korogocho in Nairobi, Kenya. Through the organization, community members get opportunities to creatively transform public spaces in their neighbourhood whether that is through music, murals, or matatus (i.e. buses).


    In this episode, you'll learn about:

    • How their Future Yetu program is breaking down barriers between the public and public policymakers
    • How digital storytelling can be an important tool in addressing climate change
    • How Hope Raisers leveraged local transportation to gather community insights
    • Why Daniel thinks integrating youth in city-building and climate adaptation initiatives is important
    • and much more!


    Guest: Daniel Onyango


    Music by Imany Lambropoulos


    More Urban Limitrophe:

    • Episode show notes and references: www.urbanlimitrophe.com
    • Instagram: @urbanlimitrophe 
    • Podcast concept and development by Alexandra Lambropoulos. Please address any related communication to hello[at]urbanlimitrophe.com.
    41m | Apr 30, 2021
Urban Limitrophe
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