EPISODES
  • Tyrone Cotton: The Louisville Legend You Must Hear

    Tyrone Cotton, a decades-long mainstay of the Louisville, KY music scene just released his 2023 debut album, "Man Like Me." A quick listen to these songs reveals an artist who has spent decades steeped in roots music. Lizzie No spoke with Tyrone and Ray Rizzo, one of the album’s producers, about Tyrone’s journey as an artist and the making of ‘Man Like Me.’ Tyrone grew up listening to his grandfather and his friends in the neighborhood playing guitar. Along with his $60 guitar, Tyrone headed off to music school, studying classic guitar under David Kelsey. At first a shy performer, Cotton leaned into his craft and into the supportive musical community he found in Louisville. He has become a stalwart of the local music scene, playing club shows and a standing gig at a local senior center where he brings the house down with soul classics.

    This is where producer Ray Rizzo enters our story. A Kentuckian since the age of eleven, he was well-versed in the Louisville music scene when he came across Tyrone and his music at The Rudyard Kipling, a club in town. Ray’s admiration for Tyrone’s songwriting and musical instincts was a guiding principle as they went into the studio to record ‘Man Like Me.’ Rizzo had spent years watching Cotton perform and wanted to make sure that he captured the magic he had witnessed so many times. If the confident, eclectic roots of ‘Man Like Me’ are any indication, Tyrone Cotton has more stories to tell and we will be lucky to listen. What makes this album special is what makes the best Americana albums special: a patchwork of influences and traditions, the best of contemporary recording techniques, and a singular storytelling voice.


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    34m | Feb 15, 2024
  • Radio Waves to Musical Bliss: Talia Schlanger's Harmonious Journey, ep. 248

    Canada's Talia Schlanger is best known for her work in broadcasting; guest-hosting Q with Tom Power on CBC and Alec Baldwin's "Here's the Thing" podcast, as well as taking over for David Dye on NPR Music's World Cafe in Philadelphia. Before all that, Talia was an actor and singer in many theater productions including Mamma Mia, Queen's We Will Rock You and Green Day's American Idiot. While she has found much success in her two previous careers, something has been pulling on Talia for years. She wanted to write, record and perform her own music. She had something to say and made the brave leap into the unknown and left her coveted role at WXPN's World Cafe in order to say it. The culmination of events has led Talia to her debut album, Grace for Going.

    In our conversation, Talia shares insights into her upbringing in Thornhill, Ontario, within a Jewish family deeply rooted in faith and family heritage. She reflects on the impact of her grandparents, Holocaust survivors, and how their stories shaped her childhood. Talia talks about her unique journey from performing in 8 shows a week in theater productions to becoming a distinguished radio host. Her evolution as a singer, her bravery and some important boundaries have allowed her to find her authentic voice while maintaining a crucial work-life balance. Throughout the interview, she touches on themes of personal growth, acts of kindness, and her commitment to learning and curiosity, offering a fascinating glimpse into the life and career of this remarkable person.


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    1h 2m | Feb 8, 2024
  • Elise Leavy is the Faerie Kid of Folk, ep. 247

    Dive into the enchanting world of Elise Leavy, a musician hailing from the picturesque Monterey, California through her latest album A Little Longer. Elise's artistic journey is steeped in the influence of her magical surroundings and a childhood filled with music, thanks to her mom's painting and stepdad's musical talents. Growing up with a deep appreciation for nature and a belief in faeries, Elise shares how these elements shaped her musical perspective.

    As we explore Elise's musical evolution, we touch on her experiences with live performances, overcoming stage fright, and the art of songwriting. Her unique approach to music, stemming from a background rich in magical thinking, reflects in her exploration of various musical instruments, from accordion to guitar, piano, fiddle, and more. We also uncover the impact of her time at summer camps, fostering a sense of community that continues to shape her artistic expression.

    The episode delves into the intriguing intersection of Elise's musical journey and homeschooling, highlighting the unconventional path she took to prioritize her love for music. She left public school in eighth grade to focus on music and worked her schedule around attending music camps. She would go on to study at New England Conservatory Of Music in Boston, lived briefly in New York and after several years in Nashville, she has recently found herself living in Lafayette, LA. The songs on her new album A Little Longer were mostly written while she lived in Boston and New York. Elise also opens up about her connection to music, magical creatures, and the harmonious blend of romance in her musical creations.

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    51m | Feb 1, 2024
  • Strings of Support: Sarah Jarosz's Mentors and Co-Writing Magic, ep. 246

    Sarah Jarosz is what happens when young women are taken seriously. A huge part of the mandolinist’s story is that she had supportive male mentors and that has added to her confidence. We all know the age old story of “Young woman shows promise, gets exploited by the patriarchy and it affects her work.” We need to hear stories like this. Starting in her hometown of Wimberley, Texas, just 45 minutes outside of Austin - the live music capital of the world, Sarah found the mandolin at ten years old. Labeled a prodigy and thanks to the encouraging spirit of folk music, she found music mentorship with seasoned professionals like David Grisman, Ricky Scaggs, Tim O’Brien and Bela Fleck. After her time at The New England Conservatory of Music, she moved to New York and would go on to collaborate with people like Chris Thile in the Live From Here House Band and her trio I’m With Her, featuring Aoife O’Donovan and Sara Watkins and won four Grammys.

    After making the move to Nashville, on her latest album, the very impressive and sonically expansive Polaroid Lovers, Jarosz collaborated with producer Daniel Tashian, which originally was just a low-stakes co-writing project. The success of her first co-writing experience with Daniel led her to pursue other songwriting sessions with Ruston Kelly and Natalie Hemby. The collaboration found on the record has opened Sarah up to new sounds and new experiences. In our conversation, we talk about Sarah stepping into her own voice with confidence on this record and knowing her musical self enough at this point in her life. She describes her experience with ​confidence using the ​Dunning–Kruger effect, in which people with limited competence in a particular domain overestimate their abilities. AKA Fake it till you make, AKA Leap and the net will appear. She also talks about her parents' influence on her early musicality and how her mom is doing with her cancer remission. An overall theme of this conversation is that Sarah never lost sight of her goal: keeping it all about the music and don’t let noise get in the way of your important work.

    Also! For those interested in Sarah's #1 skincare product: HERE YOU ARE.

    ORDER/STREAM LIZZIE NO'S NEW ALBUM HALFSIES: https://orcd.co/halfsies

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    59m | Jan 25, 2024
  • Imaginary People Chronicles: Viv & Riley's Tradition and Innovation, ep. 245

    Vivian Leva and Riley Calcagno, known as Viv & Riley, dive deep into the nuances of old-time music, folk influences, and the process behind their album, Imaginary People. The duo, who ​met ​at ​a ​music ​camp ​in ​Port ​Townsend, ​Washington, trace their roots from Riley's disciplined musical practice to Viv's intuitive approach. The two found inspiration from growing up in the Seattle area listening to KEXP (Riley), to living in Portland, Oregon to their current home in Durham, North Carolina. Drawing on their experiences at fiddlers conventions and music camps, Viv & Riley reflect on the transformative power of collaboration and the vibrant community that has shaped their unique sound in their duo as well as their other band, The Onlies.

    As they share insights into their songwriting process, the episode unravels the intricate layers of Imaginary People, delving into the harmonious blend of indie roots and experimental production that defines their latest release. With a nod to their eclectic influences, including the supportive atmosphere of Durham, NC the duo discusses the evolution of their sound under the guidance of producer Alex Bingham from Hiss Golden Messenger, who produced their latest album. 

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    1h 2m | Jan 18, 2024
  • Rachael Kilgour's Tribute to her Extraordinary Ordinary Dad, ep. 244

    Rachael Kilgour unravels the layers of her late father on the album, "My Father Loved Me." Recorded in the cold of Toronto and produced by Rose Cousins (who also joins us for this conversation), this album carries the essence of Canadian roots and is a profound exploration of family heritage through the lens of an ordinary, hard working and humble man who died in 2017. The Duluth-born Rachael, and Rose, based in Halifax, reflect on their cold weather experiences, infusing the recording process with warmth despite the chilly Canadian setting.

    The core of our discussion revolves around Rachael's deep emotional connection to the album, particularly her poignant exploration of the father-daughter relationship amidst the challenges of dementia. We navigate the themes of grief, death, and identity, while learning about Rachael's father and how he has impacted and continues to live on through Rachael's personality and idiosyncrasies. They shared the struggle of anxiety and self-doubt, which the songwriter addresses on the album. We also get a look into Rose's perspective on Rachael's growth and the impact the vulnerable creative process has had on her songwriting. And then, we wrap it all up with a very fun Dad-themed lightning round.

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    59m | Jan 11, 2024
  • Crying in Music: Darrell Scott's Honest Artistry, ep. 243

    The cover of Darrell Scott's latest album, Old Cane Back Rocker, immediately sets the tone for your listening experience. The inclusion of the names of the Darrell Scott String Band (Bryn Davies, Matt Flinner and Shad Cobb) lets you know right off the bat that this recording is a band effort. The photo on the album cover gives a visual of Scotts' family roots in rural Kentucky. His cousin Dwight Messer is standing in front of his former childhood home, now abandoned on the family land. The music reflects his family's story: some, like Dwight, stayed behind and some, like Darrell's father, Wayne Scott, moved up north to find work. Despite being raised in the north, Darrell's home has always felt like Kentucky and traditional music learned from there. These songs showcase those roots.

    In our conversation, Darrell digs into the darkness that can be heard in his music, even if it's not a sad song. He talks about his friend and frequent collaborator, Tim O'Brien, and how his performance and writing has allowed Scott to level up. Darrell also speaks to leaning into emotional songwriting and trusting his tears during the creative process. He shares the emotional account of rerecording his father's song This Weary Way and how he used to think Hank Williams had actually written it. Immediately after we finished our interview, lizzie texted me "what a cool eccentric intellectual dude." Couldn't have said it better myself. This episode honestly discovers the true essence of Darrell Scott—an artist whose music resonates with the soul, rooted in the traditions of Kentucky. 

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    1h 16m | Jan 4, 2024
  • Folk Legacy: Celebrating 25 Years of Club Passim's campfire. Festival

    Let's get folking special! We're closing out 2023 with an exclusive live recording from folk mothership Club Passim, the historic folk venue located in Cambridge, MA, celebrating the bi-annual festival campfire. and its remarkable 25th anniversary. It started as a way for the club to book a slow holiday weekend and now 25 years later, campfire. is still held every Memorial Day and Labor Day weekend and remains an extremely popular fundraiser for Passim. Cindy and lizzie host this live show featuring captivating performances by lizzie, Zachariah Hickman, Kara McKee, and Mercedes Escobar. Additionally, listeners are treated to a rare on-stage interview with Managing Director and campfire. founder Matt Smith and Club Manager and campfire. programmer Abby Altman, providing unique insights into the festival's evolution and the passion that fuels its success.

    The episode highlights the unpredictability of campfire., where both emerging artists and legends like Peter Wolf share the sacred stage. Matt Smith and Abby Altman's dedication shines through as they discuss their exhaustive efforts in planning, booking, and executing nearly 60 campfires, showcasing the heart and soul behind this beloved festival. 


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    1h 0m | Dec 28, 2023
  • Maya de Vitry & Ethan Jodziewicz are Seriously Playful, ep. 242

    Songwriter Maya de Vitry and bassist Ethan Jodziewicz come to their partnership with an understanding for their chosen lifestyle and a creative playfulness that enhances their connection. While Maya's roots are firmly planted in folk music, Ethan brings classical music and improvisation to the table. They've been collaborating together since Maya's post-Stray Birds solo career, which launched in early 2019 with her record, Adaptations. Fast forward to 2023, they are back alongside Joel Timmons and Hannah Delynn with the fabulous new EP Infinite. For the first time in years, Maya is back on the road, while Ethan has been touring basically non-stop with musicians like Aoife O'Donovan, Sierra Hull and Lindsay Lou. In our conversation, they talk about how it's helpful to be in a relationship with someone who is also deeply committed to a musician's lifestyle while understanding when someone needs a break.

    Maya also reflects on her current state of being within her body and how she has trouble recognizing physical pain to the point where she can't move. She talks of the realization that she had the tendency to tense up when picking up a guitar and how that was because she felt like she didn't belong. Ethan and Maya share their observations on working within a boundary. Ethan laments that he often works within a boundary with improvisation while Maya speaks of placing limitations around touring and performing live shows. We end this insightful interview with Maya revealing celebrity sightings are her Nashville Starbucks and a very fun Lightning Round called "Which One."

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    59m | Dec 14, 2023
  • Rosanne Cash is Not a Regular Mom, ep. 241

    Thirty years ago, Rosanne Cash experienced an all-encompassing transformation. She had just left Nashville, her major label record deal and her marriage. She was living in New York and found herself falling in love with her producer, the guitarist John Leventhal. Her previous album Interiors had set the stage for the new Rosanne. With her landmark album, The Wheel, Cash and Leventhal came together to work on a brand new sound for the artist, who had a well established career in mainstream country along with multiple #1 radio hits. She blew it all up for love! Cash had been unhappy and was yearning to live a life of authenticity in her music and her personal life. Three decades later, she's reissued The Wheel and is ready to TALK ABOUT IT.

    In our conversation, Rosanne addresses the inner critic and how she's come to harness its power for good in the editing process. She took a painting class, where she painted a picture of her inner critic and has never looked back. After her divorce, she struggled with motherhood while trying not to ruin her kids' lives. She looks back now with regrets and guilt as most mothers do. Her saving grace is that she was not a normal mom. Her oldest daughter assures her that she would not want a normal mom. We also talk about John's upcoming solo debut album and why the two have established their own record label. Rosanne Cash is a treasure and I very much appreciated this deep dive into such a pivotal moment in her career and life!

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    30m | Dec 7, 2023
  • Iron & Wine: Navigating the High School Reunion of My Music Career, ep. 240

    Long before the world fell in love with the music of Iron & Wine, and even before he knew that he wanted a career in music, Sam Beam knew that he loved making things. His parents, who didn’t necessarily understand their artsy kid but wanted to support him, kept Sam well-supplied in drawing paper and art supplies so that his imagination could run free. Sam knew that he was different from other kids but that didn’t bother him. In his early days of making music, Sam obsessively honed his skills as a producer so that he could present the most polished songs possible. It wasn’t until later that he realized that live performance was just as important a part of his craft. Following his own curiosity has enabled Sam to remain intellectually energized throughout two decades of touring and releasing music.


    One thing you might not know about Iron & Wine is that he has worked with the same manager for his entire career. When he met Howard Greynolds, Sam’s music career was just beginning to take off. Howard quickly proved that he cared more about the music than about getting money and credit. Their relationship has deepened and evolved over the years as Iron & Wine has become one of the most beloved singer-songwriters in folk music, and the music industry has reinvented itself in the age of streaming. 


    Iron & Wine is notoriously private and mysterious, but that might be about to change with the release of ‘Who Can See Forever,’ a meditative documentary. The project started as a concert film but the director, Josh Sliffe, was able to convince Sam to sit for a series of interviews reflecting on his life, his work, parenthood, creativity, craft, and legacy. Those conversations find Sam looking back but mostly looking forward with curiosity and acceptance. 


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    1h 7m | Nov 30, 2023
  • Travis Book is a Practical Romantic, ep. 239

    After two decades in The Infamous Stringdusters, the Grammy-award winning neo bluegrass band, Travis Book releases his rock americana debut: Love and Other Strange Emotions. That's not to say that Book, who thrives on collaboration, got here on his own. The Colorado musician (now residing in Western North Carolina), was raised by parents who went out their way to ensure that young Travis respected music and had access to instruments. His mother bought him his first bass guitar and his dad allowed him to buy Red Hot Chilli Peppers Blood Sugar Sex Magik (even though it had a parental advisory sticker on the cover). As Travis went off to college in Durango, CO, he found a supportive and vibrant Bluegrass scene where he encountered future members of Greensky Bluegrass (Anders Beck), Leftover Salmon (Andy Thorn) and The Jon Stickley Trio. Those musicians would form their first bluegrass band Broke Mountain Bluegrass Band, which has just reissued a remastered version of their album Cabin in the Hills.

    In our conversation, Travis talks about his brief time in Nashville, after he auditioned for The Stringdusters and got the gig as their upright bass player and vocalist. Spoiler alert: he felt VERY intimidated. We get into why he loves collaborations so much and has chosen to create his variety show turned podcast, The Travis Book Happy Hour, into an engine for unique performances with guests like Lindsay Lou, Jim Lauderdale, Sierra Hull and many more. The Happy Hour, which started in Spring 2020, was first set without an audience, which made Travis let go of his attachment to their reaction using wisdom borrowed from Eastern philosophy. He also explains how he is romantic, yet practical in everything he works to accomplish. Travis is a literal ray of positivity, so if you're having a bad day, I promise that this conversation's gonna lift you up in a seriously not-cornball way. TRAVIS!

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    1h 11m | Nov 16, 2023
  • Caroline Cotter: Home is Where the Ocean Is, ep. 238

    Former trumpet player and anxious adventurer Caroline Cotter had been constantly on the move performing hundreds of live shows since 2015. At the dawn of the pandemic she had a full album in the can and ready to go. When the world shut down, so did she. She set her songs to the side and didn't pick up her guitar for a long while. She left her city of Portland, Maine and headed even more north to the Acadia region and reconnected with nature: i.e. hugging as many trees and rocks and one woman can. Also during that time, she had the opportunity to sit with her shelved album. She discovered something amazing in that stillness: She, along with co-producer Alec Spiegelman, had made a fucking bomb record. She went forward with release plans, blew up her Kickstarter goal and finally gave us her third album, Gently as I Go, this past August.

    In our conversation, Caroline talks about what she's like to work with in the studio (hint: she is not a relaxed and calm dreamboat) as well as her relationship to rest. As someone who has struggled with anxiety, she did not take to rest naturally, however, she’s cultivated a yoga and meditation practice in order to maintain calm. We also dig into her history: talking about how the ocean has remained a constant in her relationship to home. Growing up in Rhode Island, she and her siblings all took piano lessons. Heading to college, she majored in art with a minor in Spanish. She has a reputation for being a globe-trotter, which began in her travels to Thailand, Spain and Portugal as an international educator. She quit her day-job in 2015 to pursue music with a basically nonexistent fanbase. These days, Caroline's fans are many and they are dedicated. You don't find many independent musicians with such a devoted crowd as Caroline: they buy her music, they attend her shows, they put her up when she's in town. So hello all you Cotter-Kickers, hope this conversation does your favorite songwriter justice.

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    55m | Nov 9, 2023
  • Jobi Riccio is an Outdoor Kid, ep. 237

    Jobi Riccio has only begun to scratch the surface of what they have to offer on their debut album Whiplash. The songwriting is centered around self-discovery and mourning past lives laid alongside super smart country and pop melodies. Our hero grew up an outdoor kid amongst the woods of Red Rocks Parks and Amphitheatre in Colorado. A strong bluegrass community encircled her playing from a very young age in a way that encouraged her to pursue music as a career. She spent time in Boston attending Berklee College of Music nestled in the folk community centered around the historic venue Club Passim. Then March 2020 hit.

    Jobi left her newfound community and found herself back in her childhood bedroom. She was “wrestling with all the complications of finding herself and her place in the world while letting go of her childhood and the sense of grounding that came with it.” Eventually, they made their way to Asheville, North Carolina to work on Whiplash. In the studio, she took her time making the album and discovered that, indeed, she had a strong sense of vision for the music. The trust of her collaborators allowed her to trust in herself and create an album that is turning heads and make Jobi Riccio one of the most exciting young songwriters of 2023. I loved talking to them about their origin, time in Boston and their continuing musical journey. Can't wait for you to hear her new album!

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    1h 18m | Nov 2, 2023
  • Billy Keane: Curiosity, Luck, & Drive, ep. 236

    Curiosity, luck and drive are three words that revolve around singer-songwriter Billy Keane. He was born with all three traits and they are the hallmark of his music, especially his new album Oh, These Days. The seven song cycle was written during the pandemic and right after some very big life changes: he got divorced, quit alcohol and split with his band The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow. He approached his healing process with an extreme curiosity and a need for simple living. For the last several years, he's been cultivating a simple space to ignite creativity in the Western Massachusetts town of Lenox, MA, where he owns land and a small cottage.

    In our conversation, Billy talks about his roots in spirituality and his early devotion to music. Keane was born in Australia while his father was working as a minister there. They moved their family to Connecticut when he was two years old. He left his hometown at 18 for college, but left for Seattle to work in commercial deep-sea diving. From there, he made his way to Western Mass where he found himself working at James Taylor's studio. James and his wife Kim quickly realized that Billy was a talented musician and turned into key figures and big time supporters. Oh, These Days, Billy's second album, is truly a meditation on the human experience met with an insatiable love for life and rebirth.

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    55m | Oct 26, 2023
  • Folklore Forensics with Alice Gerrard, ep. 235

    Bluegrass hero and former weird kid Alice Gerrard strongly believes that traditional music is connected to everyday life. She has said: “When you listen to traditional music you have such a sense of this connectedness of this person’s life. It comes out of the earth.” She was first exposed to folk music while attending Antioch College. Jeremy Foster (her boyfriend at the time, who would become her first husband) introduced her to The Harry Smith Anthology of American Folk Music. Upon listening, she became hooked and more drawn to lonesome and rough folk songs versus the pristine vocalists. That mentality of keeping her performance untarnished and imperfect has followed her ever since.

    After she and Jeremy moved to Washington DC, she became acquainted with Hazel Dickens. She considered Hazel a mentor figure and studied her musicality. The two would record four albums together as the seminal duo Hazel Dickens and Alice Gerrard. The two did not speak for many years after they split in the late 70's. The breakup was messy and hard for both, particularly Hazel. Years later, they reconciled and would perform and were close until Hazel's death in 2011. Nowadays, Alice, who lives in Durham, NC, has begun digitizing her huge photo archive for a book as well as performing with the younger generation of traditional music. People like Tatiana Hargreaves, Reed Stutz and Phil Cook are regulars on her stage. They also contribute to her new album Sun to Sun. Alice digs in talking about her unorthodox parenting style (which is no secret), imperfectionism, appreciating memory and the fantastic new record.  

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    1h 6m | Oct 19, 2023
  • Tré Burt, ep. 234

    This week we have a Basic Folk hero returning to the pod! Tre Burt is back today, going track by track through his new album, ‘Traffic Fiction.’ I am a longtime fan of Tre’s music, and this new release on Oh Boy Records is my favorite of his records so far. It combines what fans have come to love about Tre’s writing and unmistakable vocal performances with a new infusion of soul and Motown-inspired styles. The soulful grooves of ‘Traffic Fiction’ are souvenirs of Tre’s close relationship with his grandfather, who recently passed away. Tre recalls listening to his pops’ favorite records and invites us into his family’s musical lineage.

    The heart of the album are field recordings that Tre made of his grandfather while he was still alive. Just two people, talking about music, talking about life, encouraging one another. The simple moments that mean the most when somebody is gone. And they give us insight into one of the greatest triumphs of ‘Traffic Fiction,’ which is the transformation of melancholy into dancing. You can’t help but move your body when you hear this music, even as Tre deals with profound loss. He reminds us that being an Important Artist is not incompatible with having fun. And isn’t that what great Black artists do? Tell you the story of a tragedy in a way that somehow makes you feel joyful?

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    51m | Oct 12, 2023
  • Antje Duvekot, ep. 233

    Antje Duvekot confronts trauma with a newfound wisdom and fierceness on her new record, My New Wild West, her best in her 20 plus year career produced by her friend Mark Erelli. To put it plainly, Antje, who moved to America from Germany at age 13, had a really rough time as a teenager. She was transplanted to a totally new universe with a new language she barely understood with unsupportive and abusive parents. She soothed herself with music, her first love. She sang and played guitar very quietly, which has translated to the musician she has become. Her voice can be soft, child-like and playful, but it can also be strong and deep. The control is incredible. Not to mention, this woman's observation of the world is profound. In each song, she creates worlds that come to life with her poignant lyricism. It's arresting and always unexpected.

    This interview was different for me in that Antje and I have known each other for over two decades. That's happened before on Basic Folk, but it feels like our careers started on the exact same day and we've grown together in this messy business. The story is that we met at Club Passim (maybe it was a Gillian Welch tribute night and thanks to Matt Smith) in Cambridge, MA around 2002. It took one song and I was floored. She gave me her CD, I took it and played it over and over on the WERS Coffeehouse (the morning folk show). Every Coffeehouse DJ knew how to spell her name and would expect to field calls every time we played her music. That just doesn't happen anymore; it was right at the end of an era when radio could do that. From there, Antje's career took shape. I'll be forever grateful to her for that experience. It really felt like radio at its best: connecting a community with something really needed in an organic way. It's good to get back together in our conversation. Please excuse me if I'm a little too casual in this one! 

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    58m | Oct 5, 2023
  • Your Career vs Your Soul, ep. 232

    Your Career vs Your Soul: a debate feat. The Milk Carton Kids (Kenneth Pattengale and Joey Ryan), music journalist and Why Write Host, Kim Ruehl, Isa Burke (Lula Wiles, Aoife O’Donovan), musician and Basic Folk guest host lizzie no and yours truly, Cindy Howes, boss of Basic Folk. It's Folk Debate Club, our occasional crossover series with fellow folk-pod Why We Write!

    I’d like to think that the act of “selling out” ebbs and flows with the passing of time. As the earning power of the folk musician changes, so does the allowance of what is perceived as abandoning your principles for the almighty dollar. That doesn’t mean that it always feels great. Choices musicians have to make to further their careers can be exhausting and detrimental to their art. How do you strike that balance at the intersection of art and commerce in the folk music world?

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    1h 1m | Sep 28, 2023
  • Jenny Owen Youngs, ep. 231

    Podcaster, #1 hit songwriter, human and dog mother, gay icon Jenny Owen Youngs returns with her first full length album since 2012! In the last decade plus, Jenny has experienced a wild ride of changes like divorce, extreme grief, moving across the country, remarrying, etc. Her main project while not writing, recording and tour, she hosts podcasts like the very successful Buffering The Vampire Slayer alongside her ex-wife, Kristin Russo ("A Buffy The Vampire Slayer" rewatch pod, which is now an X-Files rewatch show called The Ex-Files). She also has songwriting credits for Panic! At the Disco, Pitbull, Ingrid Michaelson, and Brett Dennen thanks to her deal with Dan Wilson (Semisonic and epic co-writer) and his publishing company.

    JOY's new album Avalanche covers a lot of hard topics (see earlier: divorce, grief, moving, remarrying) and was produced by angel human Josh Kaufman (Taylor Swift, The National, The Hold Steady, Josh Ritter, and so on...). Jenny has always been an artist who is not afraid to show her whole self: good and the bad. Case in point: She described the inspiration for her very first break-through song "Fuck Was I" as "horrible, horrible, horrible decision making," adding it was "just your classic love gone wrong hell." Never one to back down from a fight, Jenny's approaching these songs with honesty, bravery and her biting sense of humor. It's cliche to say that talking to Jenny is a JOY, but it's a cliche for a reason. Thanks Jenny!

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    1h 3m | Sep 21, 2023
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